Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2021) 20, 181 - 187   DOI: https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2021.181

Research article
Comparison of Muscle Activity in Three Single-Joint, Hip Extension Exercises in Resistance-Trained Women
Vidar Andersen1, , Helene Pedersen1, Marius Steiro Fimland2,3, Matthew Shaw1, Tom Erik Jorung Solstad1, Nicolay Stien1, Kristoffer Toldnes Cumming4, Atle Hole Saeterbakken1
Author Information
1 Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway
2 Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
3 Unicare Helsefort Rehabilitation Centre, Rissa, Norway
4 Østfold University College, Faculty of Health and Welfare, Norway

Vidar Andersen
✉ Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway
Email: vidar.andersen@hvl.no
Publish Date
Received: 10-12-2020
Accepted: 25-01-2021
Published (online): 05-03-2021
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ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to compare neuromuscular activation in the gluteus maximus, the biceps femoris and the erector spinae from the Romanian deadlift, the 45-degree Roman chair back extension and the seated machine back extension. Fifteen resistance-trained females performed three repetitions with 6-RM loading in all exercises in a randomized and counterbalanced order. The activation in the whole movement as well as its lower and upper parts were analyzed. The results showed that the Romanian deadlift and the Roman chair back extension activated the gluteus maximus more than the seated machine back extension (94-140%, p < 0.01). For the biceps femoris the Roman chair elicited higher activation compared to both the Romanian deadlift and the seated machine back extension (71-174%). Further, the Romanian deadlift activated the biceps femoris more compared to the seated machine back extension (61%, p < 0.01). The analyses of the different parts of the movement showed that the Roman chair produced higher levels of activation in the upper part for both the gluteus maximus and the biceps femoris, compared to the other exercises. There were no differences in activation of the erector spinae between the three exercises (p = 1.00). In conclusion, both the Roman deadlift and the Roman chair back extension would be preferable to the seated machine back extension in regards to gluteus maximus activation. The Roman chair was superior in activating the biceps femoris compared to the two other exercises. All three exercises are appropriate selections for activating the lower back muscles. For overall lower limb activation, the Roman chair was the best exercise.

Key words: Gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, erector spinae, muscle activation


           Key Points
  • In general, the Roman chair back extension lead to superior muscle activation compared to the Romanian deadlift and the seated machine back extension
  • The seated machine back extension showed the lowest gluteus and hamstring activation
  • All three exercises are appropriate selections for activating the lower back muscles
  • The differences in muscle activation are most likely caused by biomechanical differences.
 
 
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