Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2021) 20, 391 - 397   DOI: https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2021.391

Research article
Acute Effects of High-intensity Resistance Exercise on Cognitive Function
John Paul V. Anders1,2, William J. Kraemer1, , Robert U. Newton3, Emily M. Post4, Lydia K. Caldwell5, Matthew K. Beeler6, William H. DuPont7, Emily R. Martini1, Jeff S. Volek1, Keijo Häkkinen8, Carl M. Maresh1, Scott M. Hayes9,10
Author Information
1 Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
10 Chronic Brain Injury Initiative, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
2 Department of Education and Human Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA
3 Exercise Medicine Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup WA 6027, Australia
4 Exercise Science Department, Ohio Dominican, Columbus, Ohio, USA
5 Applied Physiology Laboratory, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA
6 Department of Exercise Science, Hastings College, Hastings, NE, USA
7 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT, USA
8 Department of Biology of Physical Activity & Neuromuscular Research Center, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland
9 Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

William J. Kraemer
✉ Ph.D. Professor, Department of Human Sciences, 305 Annie & John Glenn Ave Office A054 PAES Bldg., The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Email: drwilliamkraemer@gmail.com
Publish Date
Received: 07-03-2021
Accepted: 22-04-2021
Published (online): 03-05-2021
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of an acute bout of high-intensity resistance exercise on measures of cognitive function. Ten men (Mean ± SD: age = 24.4 ± 3.2 yrs; body mass = 85.7 ± 11.8 kg; height = 1.78 ± 0.08 m; 1 repetition maximum (1RM) = 139.0 ± 24.1 kg) gave informed consent and performed a high-intensity 6 sets of 10 repetitions of barbell back squat exercise at 80% 1RM with 2 minutes rest between sets. The Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) was completed to assess various cognitive domains during the familiarization period, immediately before, and immediately after the high-intensity resistance exercise bout. The repeated measures ANOVAs for throughput scores (r·m-1) demonstrated significant mean differences for the Mathematical Processing task (MTH; p < 0.001, η2p = 0.625) where post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrated that the post-fatigue throughput (32.0 ± 8.8 r·m-1) was significantly greater than the pre-fatigue (23.8 ± 7.4 r·m-1, p = 0.003, d = 1.01) and the familiarization throughput (26.4 ± 5.3 r·m-1, p = 0.024, d = 0.77). The Coded Substitution-Delay task also demonstrated significant mean differences (CDD; p = 0.027, η2p = 0.394) with post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrating that the post-fatigue throughput (49.3 ± 14.4 r·m-1) was significantly less than the pre-fatigue throughput (63.2 ± 9.6 r·m-1, p = 0.011, d = 1.14). The repeated measures ANOVAs for reaction time (ms) demonstrated significant mean differences for MTH (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.624) where post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrated that the post-fatigue reaction time (1885.2 ± 582.8 ms) was significantly less than the pre-fatigue (2518.2 ± 884.8 ms, p = 0.005, d = 0.85) and familiarization (2253.7 ± 567.6 ms, p = 0.009, d = 0.64) reaction times. The Go/No-Go task demonstrated significant mean differences (GNG; p = 0.031, η2p = 0.320) with post hoc pairwise comparisons demonstrating that the post-fatigue (285.9 ± 16.3 ms) was significantly less than the pre-fatigue (298.5 ± 12.1 ms, p = 0.006, d = 0.88) reaction times. High-intensity resistance exercise may elicit domain-specific influences on cognitive function, characterized by the facilitation of simple cognitive tasks and impairments of complex cognitive tasks.

Key words: Muscle fatigue, automated neuropsychological assessment metrics, back squat, exercise stress


           Key Points
  • High-intensity squat resistance exercise may elicit domain-specific influences on cognitive function.
  • Tasks associated with information processing and response inhibition was exhibited improvement for simple cognitive tasks.
  • Complex cognitive associated with memory and recall exhibited decrements and impairments following the high-intensity back squat protocol.
  • Understanding changes in cognition under extreme physical stress is important for interpretation of physiological influences.
 
 
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