Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2022) 21, 341 - 346   DOI: https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2022.341

Research article
Effects of Changing Center of Pressure Position on Knee and Ankle Extensor Moments During Double-Leg Squatting
Tomoya Ishida , Mina Samukawa, Daisuke Endo, Satoshi Kasahara, Harukazu Tohyama
Author Information
Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

Tomoya Ishida
✉ Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, North 12, West 5, Kitaku, Sapporo 060-0812, Japan.
Email: t.ishida@hs.hokudai.ac.jp
Publish Date
Received: 18-04-2022
Accepted: 03-06-2022
Published (online): 01-09-2022
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ABSTRACT

The effects of changes in the anterior-posterior center of pressure (AP-COP) position on the lower limb joint moments during double-leg squatting remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of AP-COP positional changes on the hip, knee, and ankle extensor moments during double-leg squatting. Sixteen male participants (22.1 ± 1.5 years) performed double-leg squatting under two conditions (anterior and posterior COP conditions) with visual feedback on their COP positions. Kinematics and kinetics were analyzed using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plates. The hip, knee and ankle flexion angles and extensor moments at peak vertical ground reaction force were compared between the two conditions using paired t tests. The COP position was 53.5 ± 2.4% of the foot length, starting from the heel, under the anterior condition and 44.4 ± 2.1% under the posterior condition (P < 0.001). The knee extensor moment was significantly smaller under the anterior than the posterior COP condition (P = 0.003, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.087 to -0.021 Nm/kg/m), while the ankle extensor moment significantly larger under the anterior COP condition than under the posterior COP condition (P < 0.001, 95% CI 0.113 to 0.147 Nm/kg/m). There was no significant difference in hip extensor moment (P = 0.431). The ankle dorsiflexion angle was significantly larger under the anterior than the posterior COP condition (P = 0.003, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.6°), while there was no difference in trunk, hip, or knee flexion angle. The present results indicate that changes in the AP-COP position mainly affect the ankle and knee extensor moments during double-leg squatting, while the effect on the lower limb joint and trunk flexion angles was limited. Visual feedback on the AP-COP position could be useful for modifying the ankle and knee extensor moments during double-leg squatting.

Key words: Biomechanics, visual feedback, exercise, strength, COP


           Key Points
  • This study analyzed lower limb joint moment during double-leg squatting under two conditions to determine the effect of the center-of-pressure position on lower-limb joint moment.
  • A difference in the anterior-posterior center-of-pressure position of ~10% of foot-length changed the ankle extensor moment by 30% and the knee extensor moment by 6%.
  • No significant difference in the hip extensor moment between the two conditions.
  • The knee and ankle extensor moments during double-leg squatting can be coordinated by visual feedback about the anterior-posterior center-of-pressure position.
 
 
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