Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2022) 21, 580 - 585   DOI: https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2022.580

Research article
Comparison of the Prolonged Effects of Foam Rolling and Vibration Foam Rolling Interventions on Passive Properties of Knee Extensors
Kazuki Kasahara1, Andreas Konrad2, Riku Yoshida1, Yuta Murakami1, Ryoma Koizumi3, Sigeru Sato1, Xin Ye4, Ewan Thomas5, Masatoshi Nakamura6, 
Author Information
1 Institute for Human Movement and Medical Sciences, Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Niigata, Japan
2 Institute of Human Movement Science, Sport and Health, University of Graz, Graz, Austria
3 Department of Physical Therapy, Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Niigata, Japan
4 Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Hartford, West Hartford, USA
5 Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Unit, Department of Physiology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
6 Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nishi Kyushu University, Kanzaki, Saga, Japan

Masatoshi Nakamura
✉ Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nishi Kyushu University, 4490-9 Ozaki, Kanzaki, Saga, 842-8585, Japan.
Email: nakamuramas@nisikyu-u.ac.jp
Publish Date
Received: 27-09-2022
Accepted: 10-10-2022
Published (online): 01-12-2022
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ABSTRACT

Foam rolling (FR) and vibration foam rolling (VFR) interventions have received attention as pre-exercise warm-ups because they maintain performance and increase range of motion (ROM). However, the immediate and prolonged effects and the comparisons between FR and VFR interventions are unknown. Therefore, this study was designed to compare the effects of FR and VFR interventions on passive properties of knee extensors over time (up to 30 min after interventions). A crossover, random allocation design was used with 14 male college students (22.1 ± 1.0 years old) in the control, FR, and VFR conditions. The knee flexion ROM, pain pressure threshold (PPT), and tissue hardness were measured before and immediately after, 10, 20, and 30 minutes after the intervention. The results showed that knee flexion ROM increased significantly immediately after the intervention in both the FR and VFR conditions and maintained up to 30 minutes after both conditions. PPT increased significantly (p < 0.01) immediately after the FR intervention. In the VFR condition, there was a significant increase in PPT immediately after the intervention (p < 0.01) and 10 minutes after the intervention (p < 0.05). Tissue hardness was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) immediately after and 10 minutes after the FR intervention. However, tissue hardness in the VFR condition was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) up to 30 minutes after the intervention. The results suggest that FR and VFR interventions increase knee flexion ROM, and the effect lasts at least 30 minutes, but the effects on PPT and tissue hardness are maintained a longer time in the VFR condition compared to the FR condition. Therefore, VFR can be recommended as a warm-up before exercise to change the passive properties of knee extensors.

Key words: Range of motion, warm-up routine, pain pressure threshold, tissue hardness


           Key Points
  • We investigated the sustained effects of foam rolling (FR) and vibration foam rolling (VFR) interventions on knee flexion range of motion (ROM), pain pressure threshold, and tissue hardness.
  • FR and VFR intervention for 180 seconds increased ROM for at least up to 30 minutes.
  • The changes in pain pressure threshold and tissue hardness after VFR intervention were sustained for a longer duration rather than FR intervention.
  • VFR intervention could be recommended in sports and rehabilitation settings to increase ROM by changing the pain pressure threshold and tissue hardness.
 
 
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